Sen. Kamala Harris speaks at the National Forum on Wages and Working People: Creating an Economy That Works for All at Enclave on April 27, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Sen. Kamala Harris speaks at the National Forum on Wages and Working People: Creating an Economy That Works for All at Enclave on April 27, 2019 in Las Vegas, Nevada. Ethan Miller/Getty Images

Sen. Kamala Harris’ time has finally come. Covering her campaign so closely day in and day out, despite the missteps and miscalculations that often times come with running a first national campaign, the question always felt more “when,” and not “if” Harris would reach this level.

Despite her often low polling numbers and inability to garner massive Black support during the primary, people always wanted to hear from Harris. She could always command attention.

But the moment it was announced she would be leaving the race, it felt like a cosmic shift in attitude. Folks from all different strides of life who criticized her platform, they then voiced regret that she, the only Black woman to run for the 2020 Democratic nomination, would not be on the December 2019 debate stage.

When issues of race would come up, people on social media called out to say they wished Harris was still around to give her take. Many women described it to me as a rug being pulled from underneath them. And every contest that Harris was not in, many said her contributions were missed. 

As a Black woman who covered her campaign, the joy I see on Twitter and an innumerable number of sources calling my phone to express their views on the news, does not surprise me.

Regardless of the probability that Harris had to win the ticket, many Black women saw Harris as one of them. Someone who naturally understood their concerns and took great strides to describe them in detail on public stage. A whip smart sister who dedicated her life to achieving greatness, and striving against what felt like the impossible. Harris would often wax poetically about the challenges that she faced in her career, how when you break ceilings, sometimes you get cut.

But it’s what you do after that, that matters. And now as the first Black and Indian woman on a Democratic ticket, Harris has broken one of the ultimate ceilings in this country.